Weekly Roundup 37

i. Back to uni this week. Reflecting on my first year, and rereading my project proposal, I don’t think I’m doing as terribly as I often thought last year. I intended to develop painterly printmaking through etching and monotypes, which I’ve done. Lithography was a dead end but at least I did attempt it. I also wanted to explore the contemporary context for portraiture which I’m doing through my research paper. It’s slowly coming together but I’ve still got lots to do. I’m looking forward to getting it over with, getting back in the workshops and up my game a bit. It’s going to be a busy, but hopefully really exciting, year. I’ll also try and keep this journal going regularly again.

ii. On Thursday, I visited the private view of Surface Worlds: Reflections in the City, an exhibition by my friend Geraint Evan. The exhibition explored themes of class and consumerism through drawings (and soundscapes) made from the shop window reflections of Oxford Street. I admire Geraint’s ability to capture the minutiae of everyday life. He elevates the mundane through intricate, brooding charcoal drawings. An impressive show if a little pessimistic.

 Geraint Evans,  Window Shopping,  2017, charcoal on paper

Geraint Evans, Window Shopping, 2017, charcoal on paper

 Geraint Evans,  Who are we, where are we going?  (detail),   2018, charcoal on paper

Geraint Evans, Who are we, where are we going? (detail), 2018, charcoal on paper

iii. I was drafted in, last minute, to accompany a four-day art trip to Venice with school. It was absolutely exhausting but the kids were good, it was fun to get away and I saw some brilliant artwork (Tintoretto, Veronese, Morandi). I’m feeling slightly panicked now as I was banking on using that weekend to make some serious progress with the research paper…

iv. The Shrewdness of Apes, an exhibition my Camberwell alumnus Jack Fawdry Tatham, is currently on show in the student gallery at uni. The exhibition showcases a series of etchings that have been influenced by the natural world and human relationships. The show is fun, witty (Adam and Steve is an incredible title for an artwork!) and technically brilliant. It’s also a good reminder that I definitely want to get better at etching. I began to get somewhere at the end of last year by using aquatint, sugarlift and spit bite. Now it’s time to really push and develop those techniques - I want to get really good!

 
 Jack Fawdry Tatham,  Django King of Cats,  2017, etching

Jack Fawdry Tatham, Django King of Cats, 2017, etching